Aby Warburg – The Law of the Good Neighbor

Have you ever walked straight to your bookshelves, knowing exactly what book you were going to pick for your next read? And is it true that you ventured into reading another book, the one next to the book you wanted to read in the first place? Confusing, right? No need to worry, there is a perfectly logic explanation to it and it even has a name: the law of the good neighbor. Continue reading “Aby Warburg – The Law of the Good Neighbor”

Paul Kalanithi – Portrait of the Doctor as a Patient

We always think of doctors as some kind of superheroes, they can never be wrong, they must know everything about our pains and illnesses, but most of all, doctors never get sick. Or do they? What if what we think of them is not at all true? What if the white robes aren’t the capes worn by superheroes, but proofs that the doctors are blank canvases on which the patients are writing their own stories? Paul Kalanithi, a neurosurgeon, was such a canvas until he was diagnosed with lung cancer. Totally aware of the inevitable ending, he decided to write a book. When Breath becomes Air is a story of life, death and how to fight an illness – the doctor’s way.

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The 3rd of March – The International Day of Writers

Writers are bleeding wounds of culture. (Costel Zăgan)

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Today, on the 3rd of March, is globally celebrated the Writers’ Day – an extremely beautiful holiday in the international culture, for literature has no borders, and its role in the development of human society is essential.

Celebrated since 1986, The International Writers’ Day has been proposed by the International Congress of PEN Club. This organization formed of poets, essayists, and fictionists was founded in London in 1921 and it includes writers that approach every literary genre, from translators and journalists to historians, and its purpose is to promote mutual support among writers from all over the world. The idea of founding this association came from the English writer C. A. Dawson Scott, and its first president was John Galsworthy.

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A Cold Thursday Evening – “The Visit”

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It is a cold Thursday evening, embraced by the welcoming warmth of “Vasile Alecsandri” National Theatre, which seems derived from a painting and placed near the “Stefan cel Mare” (Stephan the Great), a street for pedestrians which is also decorated with lots of little, colorful lights. Such an evening we have spent, along with other people who were holding their breath for one of the great theatre representations of “The Visit”, by Friedrich Dürrenmatt, a Swiss writer who has brought to the fore in his literary work the problematic of justice and endurance.

A merry smile welcomed us at the entrance! It was the bright face of the lady who was in charge with checking our tickets. I was rejoicing over the beauty that slowly surrounded me, taking me away from reality. A few minutes after, we were all sitting impatiently, awaiting the show to begin.

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Time Goes By

Time is said to be eternal. It is believed that it has neither a beginning, nor an end. However, people are able to measure it in years, months, days, hours, minutes, and seconds. They have also given meanings to the words “past, “present”, and “future”.

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There are two types of time – objective, and subjective. Objective time can be accurately measured with a stopwatch. Subjective time is different. Humans are not so good at judging the passage of time. Sadly, pleasurable experiences pass quickly, while dull experiences seem to last forever. Time simply appears to speed up when we have something to do, especially during an exam, and I think everyone knows that.

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